BenzodiazepinesDiazepam

Diazepam Dosage for adult, Pediatric and Senior

What are the the Dosage of Diazepam oral for strengths: 15 mg; 5 mg/mL; 2 mg; 5 mg; 10 mg; 5 mg/5 mL; 2.5 mg; 20 mg

The Diazepam Dosage will depend on:

  • your age
  • the condition being treated
  • how severe your condition is
  • other medical conditions you have
  • how you react to the first dose

Diazepam Dosage information will cover following topic :

Usual Adult Dose for:

  • Anxiety
  • Alcohol Withdrawal
  • Muscle Spasm
  • Seizures
  • Endoscopy or Radiology Premedication
  • Status Epilepticus
  • Light Anesthesia

Usual Generic Dose for:

  • Seizures
  • Alcohol Withdrawal
  • Anxiety
  • Muscle Spasm

Usual Pediatric Dose for:

  • Seizures
  • Status Epilepticus
  • Anxiety
  • Muscle Spasm
  • Seizure Prophylaxis
  • Tetanus

Additional dosage information:

  • Renal Dose Adjustments
  • Liver Dose Adjustments
  • Dose Adjustments
  • Precautions
  • Dialysis
  • Other Comments

Usual Adult Dose for Anxiety

ORAL:

2 to 10 mg orally 2 to 4 times a day

PARENTERAL:

Moderate Anxiety Disorders and Symptoms: 2 to 5 mg IM or IV, repeated in 3 to 4 hours if necessary

Severe Anxiety Disorders and Symptoms: 5 to 10 mg IM or IV, repeated in 3 to 4 hours if necessary

Usual Adult Dose for Alcohol Withdrawal

ORAL:

Initial dose: 10 mg orally 3 to 4 times a day for the first 24 hours

Maintenance dose: 5 mg orally 3 to 4 times a day as needed

PARENTERAL:

10 mg IM or IV once, then 5 to 10 mg IM or IV in 3 to 4 hours if necessary

Usual Adult Dose for Muscle Spasm

ORAL:

2 to 10 mg orally 3 to 4 times a day

PARENTERAL:

5 to 10 mg IM or IV, then 5 to 10 mg IM or IV in 3 to 4 hours if necessary

Usual Adult Dose for Seizures

ORAL:

2 to 10 mg orally 2 to 4 times a day

RECTAL:

Initial dose: 0.2 mg/kg rectally, rounded upward to the next available dose. A 2.5 mg rectal dose may be given as a partial replacement if patients expel a portion of the initial dose

If necessary, a second dose of 0.2 mg/kg may be given rectally 4 to 12 hours after the first dose.

Maximum Frequency: May be used to treat up to 1 seizure episode every 5 days, and no more than 5 episodes/month

Usual Adult Dose for Endoscopy or Radiology Premedication

PARENTERAL:

Cardioversion: 5 to 15 mg IV once 5 to 10 minutes before the procedure

Endoscopic Procedures:

IV: Usually less than 10 mg, but some patients require up to 20 mg IV, especially when narcotics are omitted

IV titration: The IV dose should be titrated to desired sedative response (e.g., slurring of speech) with slow administration immediately before the procedure.

IM: 5 to 10 mg IM once 30 minutes prior to the procedure

Usual Adult Dose for Status Epilepticus

PARENTERAL:

Initial dose: 5 to 10 mg IV once, repeated at 10 to 15 minute intervals to a maximum dose of 30 mg if necessary

Usual Adult Dose for Light Anesthesia

PARENTERAL:

Preoperative Medication: 10 mg IM once before surgery

Usual Geriatric Dose for Seizures

ORAL:

Initial dose: 2 to 2.5 mg orally once to 2 times a day

RECTAL:

Initial dose: 0.2 mg/kg rectally, rounded downward to the next available dose. A 2.5 mg rectal dose may be given as a partial replacement if patients expel a portion of the initial dose

If necessary, a second dose of 0.2 mg/kg may be given rectally 4 to 12 hours after the first dose.

Maximum Frequency: May be used to treat up to 1 seizure episode every 5 days, and no more than 5 episodes/month

Usual Geriatric Dose for Alcohol Withdrawal

ORAL:

Initial dose: 2 to 2.5 mg orally once to 2 times a day

PARENTERAL:

Initial dose: 2 to 5 mg IM or IV, repeated in 3 to 4 hours if necessary

Usual Geriatric Dose for Anxiety

ORAL:

Initial dose: 2 to 2.5 mg orally once to 2 times a day

PARENTERAL:

Initial dose: 2 to 5 mg IM or IV, repeated in 3 to 4 hours if necessary

Usual Geriatric Dose for Muscle Spasm

ORAL:

Initial dose: 2 to 2.5 mg orally once to 2 times a day

PARENTERAL:

Initial dose: 2 to 5 mg IM or IV, repeated in 3 to 4 hours if necessary

Usual Pediatric Dose for Seizures

ORAL:

6 months and older:

Initial dose: 1 to 2.5 mg orally 3 to 4 times a day

RECTAL:

2 to 5 years:

Initial dose: 0.5 mg/kg rectally, rounded upward to the next available dose. A 2.5 mg rectal dose may be given as a partial replacement if patients expel a portion of the initial dose

If necessary, a second dose of 0.5 mg/kg may be given rectally 4 to 12 hours after the first dose.

Maximum Frequency: 1 episode every 5 days, and no more than 5 episodes/month

6 to 11 years:

Initial dose: 0.3 mg/kg rectally, rounded upward to the next available dose. A 2.5 mg rectal dose may be given as a partial replacement if patients expel a portion of the initial dose

If necessary, a second dose of 0.3 mg/kg may be given rectally 4 to 12 hours after the first dose.

Maximum Frequency: 1 episode every 5 days, and no more than 5 episodes/month

12 years and older:

Initial dose: 0.2 mg/kg rectally, rounded upward to the next available dose. A 2.5 mg rectal dose may be given as a partial replacement if patients expel a portion of the initial dose

If necessary, a second dose of 0.2 mg/kg may be given rectally 4 to 12 hours after the first dose.

Maximum Frequency: May be used to treat up to 1 seizure episode every 5 days, and no more than 5 episodes/month

Usual Pediatric Dose for Status Epilepticus

PARENTERAL:

IV Injection:

30 days to less than 5 years: 0.2 to 0.5 mg slow IV injection every 2 to 5 minutes, up to a maximum dose of 5 mg. Repeat in 2 to 4 hours if needed.

5 years and older: 1 mg slow IV injection every 2 to 5 minutes, up to a maximum dose of 10 mg. Repeat in 2 to 4 hours if needed.

Usual Pediatric Dose for Anxiety

ORAL:

6 months and older: Initial dose: 1 to 2.5 mg orally 3 to 4 times a day

Usual Pediatric Dose for Muscle Spasm

ORAL:

6 months and older:

Initial dose: 1 to 2.5 mg orally 3 to 4 times a day

Usual Pediatric Dose for Seizure Prophylaxis

ORAL:

6 months and older:

Initial dose: 1 to 2.5 mg orally 3 to 4 times a day

Usual Pediatric Dose for Tetanus

PARENTERAL:

30 days to 5 years: 1 to 2 mg IM or slow IV injection, repeated every 3 to 4 hours as necessary

5 years and older: 5 to 10 mg IM or slow IV injection, repeated every 3 to 4 hours as necessary to control spasms

Renal Dose Adjustments

Renal dysfunction:

Oral formulations: Data not available

Parenteral and rectal formulations: Use with caution

Liver Dose Adjustments

Patients with liver disease: Use with caution (parenteral and rectal formulations)

Mild to moderate hepatic insufficiency: Dose adjustment(s) may be required; however, no specific guidelines have been suggested. Caution recommended. (oral formulations)

Severe hepatic insufficiency: Contraindicated (oral formulations)

Dose Adjustments

Debilitated patients:

Oral:

Initial dose: 2 to 2.5 mg orally once or 2 times a day

Parenteral:

Initial dose: 2 to 5 mg once a day

Rectal:

Initial dose: 0.2 mg/kg rectally, rounded downward to the next available dose. A 2.5 mg rectal dose may be given as a partial replacement if patients expel a portion of the initial dose

If necessary, a second dose of 0.2 mg/kg may be given rectally 4 to 12 hours after the first dose.

Maximum Frequency: May be used to treat up to 1 seizure episode every 5 days, and no more than 5 episodes/month

Special considerations

People with debilitating disease:

The usual starting dose is 2–2.5 mg, given 1–2 times per day.

Your doctor will slowly increase your dose as needed based on how you’re responding to and tolerating this medication.


Take as per Directed

Diazepam oral tablet is used for short-term treatment. It comes with serious risks if you don’t take it as prescribed.

If you miss a dose: Take it when you remember, but don’t take more than one dose per day. Never try to catch up by taking two doses at once. This could cause toxic side effects.

If you don’t take it: Your symptoms (anxiety, tremors or agitation from alcohol withdrawal, muscle spasms, or seizures) won’t get better.

If you suddenly stop taking it: You may have withdrawal symptoms, such as:

  • tremors
  • stomach and muscle cramps or pain
  • vomiting
  • sweating
  • headache
  • extreme anxiety
  • tension
  • restlessness
  • confusion
  • irritability
  • hallucinations
  • seizures

The risks for withdrawal are greater if you’ve been taking diazepam for a long time.

If you take too much: Taking too much of this drug can cause depression of your central nervous system (CNS). Symptoms include:

  • drowsiness
  • confusion
  • tiredness
  • poor reflexes
  • slowing or stopping of your breathing
  • dangerously low blood pressure
  • coma
Disclaimer :  This information is to supplement, not substitute to the judgment of healthcare professionals. The information is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, drug interactions or adverse effects, nor should it be construed to indicate that use of a particular drug is safe, appropriate or effective for you or anyone else. A healthcare professional should be consulted before taking any medicine, changing any diet or commencing or discontinuing any course of treatment.

Also read : Full article on Diazepam

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